Using RX 6 and Ozone 7 on "Triple Platinum" by Rick Ross ft. Scrilla

by Jon Simmons

August 1, 2017

Salem Psalms in studio

Amond Jackson, Chief Engineer at Salem Psalms Studios

Atlanta, Georgia has given rise to many of the most listened-to rappers of the last two decades. From André 3000 and Big Boi to Ludacris and T.I., along with newcomers like Raury and Migos, Atlanta is continuously fostering new hip-hop talent.

But as much as we think of rappers as the city’s top hip-hop exports, we’d be remiss to not include the top-notch production and engineering work that goes down in The ATL.

Amond Jackson, Chief Engineer at Salem Psalms Studios in Atlanta, works with some of the best rappers and producers in Atlanta-born hip-hop: Killer Mike, CeeLo Green, Yung Joc to name a few, as well as others from outside city limits like Raekwon the Chef (of Wu Tang Clan) and STREETRUNNER.

We caught up with Jackson and asked him how he used RX 6 and Ozone 7 on "Triple Platinum" by Rick Ross ft. Scrilla (produced by The Olympiks and Analogic).

“As an engineer, it's my goal to bring the artist’s or producer's vision to life while maintaining the fragile balance between creativity and what is sonically translatable through multiple listening formats. iZotope RX helps me do that every time.” —Amond Jackson, Chief Engineer, Salem Psalms Studios

How Amond Jackson Used RX 6 and Ozone 7 on "Triple Platinum"

"Rick Ross had already picked up the instrumental for his first Epic Records album release Rather You Than Me. The Olympiks, a brilliant production team, sent me the instrumental to mix before they turned in the final record.

"One of the first challenges I encountered was the kick drum. While it was the perfect tone, there was a subtle distortion that was clashing with the rest of the track. It was occupying too much room in the stereo field and was going to make it difficult for the vocals to breathe. Rather than asking the producers for a different kick drum, I removed the distortion with RX De-crackle without negative effects on the feel of the kick.

"Next, I counter-EQ'd it with Ozone 7’s EQ, pulling out frequencies that wouldn't have been possible with the distortion present. Distortion is important for character, and as counter-intuitive as it sounds, it’s often necessary for clarity. Sometimes, though, prior to a professional track mix, distortion is used more aggressively than it should be because some elements of the composition don't cut through well without it.

"Once the song's instrumentation has been processed through the vagaries of my bizarre mix brain, the track can breathe more. It usually opens the track up and creates lots of opportunities for the most moody parts of the song to have enough room to be fully experienced. That’s when all the beautiful details of the producer's composition can come to life and be appreciated by the listener. They can emotionally connect to the song more effortlessly.

"In my mind, it isn't ever the producer's job to create a perfect mix. It's their job to make a dope wave for an artist to vibe and create to. That’s how masterpieces are born. I enjoy giving the producers and artists I mix for the freedom to create without having to worry so much about the technicalities. That’s what I'm here for. As an engineer, it's my goal to bring the artist’s or producer's vision to life while maintaining the fragile balance between creativity and what is sonically translatable through multiple listening formats. iZotope RX helps me do that every time."

Check out RX 6 and Ozone 7 for yourself. Want to read more "behind the song" interviews with musicians and producers? Sign up for our weekly newsletter: